Adrenal insufficiency due to steroid use

A discussion on stress should include recognition of Dr. Hans Selye. His classic work on stress ( The Stress of Life , McGraw- Hill Book Co., .) and his many other publications report “that our various internal organs, especially the endocrine glands and the nervous system, help to adjust us to the constant changes which occur in and around us. He calls this adjustment the General Adaptation Syndrome. Selye concluded that the adrenals were the body’s prime reactors to stress. He stated that the adrenals “…are the only organs that do not shrink under stress; they thrive and enlarge. If you remove them, and subject an animal to stress it can’t live. But if you remove them, and then inject extract of cattle adrenals (cortex), stress resistance will vary in direct proportion to the amount of the injection, and even be put back to normal.” Likewise a person’s stress resistance will vary with the competence of his adrenals, but continually stressing the adrenals finally depletes them.

Endocrinologists are specialists in hormonal diseases, including adrenal and pituitary conditions that cause secondary adrenal insufficiency. An endocrinologist will have more training and experience in properly diagnosing and treating secondary adrenal insufficiency than most physicians. Most cases of permanent secondary adrenal insufficiency should be managed by an endocrinologist.  In cases of steroid withdrawal for the treatment of medical conditions, endocrinologists often work with the primary physician or specialist in that disease to assess the recovery of pituitary-adrenal reserve and provide guidance about whether long term glucocorticoid therapy is needed.

During minor illness (., flu or fever >38° C [° F]) the hydrocortisone dose should be doubled for 2 or 3 days. The inability to ingest hydrocortisone tablets warrants parenteral administration. Most patients can be educated to self administer hydrocortisone, 100 mg IM, and reduce the risk of an emergency room visit. Hydrocortisone, 75 mg/day, provides adequate glucocorticoid coverage for outpatient surgery. Parenteral hydrocortisone, 150 to 200 mg/day (in three or four divided doses), is needed for major surgery, with a rapid taper to normal replacement during the recovery. Patients taking more than 100 mg hydrocortisone/day do not need any additional mineralocorticoid replacement. All patients should wear some form of identification indicating their adrenal insufficiency status.

Thank you Lisa for the informative article. I’m new with the ADI, starting with Cortisol AM, . PM
I’m taking HC 20mg am
5mg PM. I’m not positive but I believe the ADI started from getting Cortisone injections for Chronic back pain, over a period of 10yrs. Injections at L-4-5 levels, SI Joints, Sciatic, Hip and knees. They do help controlling pain for sure.
I’ve never been told that these have or Could cause the condition so I was wondering in your research, if you’ve seen any studies concerning this type of cause

Adrenal insufficiency due to steroid use

adrenal insufficiency due to steroid use

Thank you Lisa for the informative article. I’m new with the ADI, starting with Cortisol AM, . PM
I’m taking HC 20mg am
5mg PM. I’m not positive but I believe the ADI started from getting Cortisone injections for Chronic back pain, over a period of 10yrs. Injections at L-4-5 levels, SI Joints, Sciatic, Hip and knees. They do help controlling pain for sure.
I’ve never been told that these have or Could cause the condition so I was wondering in your research, if you’ve seen any studies concerning this type of cause

Media:

adrenal insufficiency due to steroid useadrenal insufficiency due to steroid useadrenal insufficiency due to steroid useadrenal insufficiency due to steroid useadrenal insufficiency due to steroid use

http://buy-steroids.org